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Finning adopt CESAR to safeguard Cat machines

FINNING are now fitting the official CESAR plant registration and security system to all new Caterpillar machines supplied by the company and have made a retro-fit service  available to existing customers.

With over 26,000 machines registered in construction and agriculture, CESAR, which is supported by The Home Office and the British Insurance Association, provides a powerful deterrent against theft and an assured way of identifying a machine in the unlikely event of theft.

Statistics compiled by the Metropolitan Police show that CESAR-registered machines are six times more likely to be recovered in the event of theft than unregistered machines, and four times less likely to be stolen in the first place.

Finning engineers are now fitting CESAR, at the pre-delivery stage, to the full Caterpillar product line-up from the smallest mini-excavator to the largest rigid dumptruck. As such, this encompasses the widest product range of any OEM fitting CESAR as standard and includes tracked and wheeled excavators, wheel loaders, articulated dumptrucks, telehandlers and crawler tractors up to 104 tonnes in weight.

The move follows the recent launch of Finning’s www.lastability.com campaign pledge to save the industry £10 million this year. CESAR is seen as another aspect of this concept helping to minimize the cost and disruption caused by plant theft.

Finning (UK) sales support manager Tim Ballard said: ‘Finning have recognized that deterring plant theft is an important consideration for the industry as a whole and therefore we have acted on recent advice from a number of sources to implement a step change as part of our ‘Lastability’ promise to the industry. As we explore further options with Caterpillar and other leading security suppliers, we will evaluate additional options for customers.’

Finning engineers have been trained by the Datatag team to fit CESAR and the first Cat machines with the now familiar triangular registration plates began rolling out of Finning’s Cannock preparation centre in early March.

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