Agg-Net

The Aggregates & Recycling Information Network
Mobile Menu
From the organisers of
 

Rye Group operate new Sandvik QJ241 with HVO

Sandvik QJ241 mobile jaw crusher

Demolition firm running mobile jaw crusher on hydro-treated vegetable oil as part of sustainability standard

RYE Group have recently invested in a new Sandvik QJ241 mobile jaw crusher from Retec Equipment Ltd, Sandvik distributor for the Southern counties, and in line with the rest of their fleet, are operating it with HVO rather than diesel fuel.

Rye Group were the first SME demolition company in the UK to transition their entire fleet to HVO as a key initiative in their sustainability drive. Likewise, Sandvik were the first in the industry to roll this out for their tracked range of mobile crushing and screening equipment back in 2021.

Established in 2006 with headquarters in Flitwick, Bedfordshire, Rye Group specialize in all types of demolition, remediation, groundworks and enabling works, aiming to provide quality services in a safe and sustainable fashion, and helping their clients to deliver on their goals whilst making a positive impact on the environment and communities in which they operate.

Rye operate under the banner of The Sustainable Standard, with a particular focus on reducing their carbon footprint. They have already won two awards for their efforts in driving environmental initiatives forward in 2022; a ‘Sustainability Award’ from the National Federation of Demolition Contractors (NFDC) and ‘Best Green Initiative Award’ from Hill Group’s Supply Chain Awards evening.

Similarly, Sandvik, as manufacturers of heavy equipment for the aggregates and demolition industries, also have a responsibility to make the shift towards more sustainable business. The company’s sustainable business strategy is based on international guidelines and principles, aligned to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, and embedded in its everyday business practices.

Sandvik were first in the mobile crushing and screening industry to start using HVO in 2021 and have been shifting over to supplying all their hydraulically driven units with HVO instead of diesel. HVO (hydrotreated vegetable oil) is a form of renewable synthetic diesel which forms a part in both companies’ journey towards a more sustainable future. The use of HVO reduces net carbon emissions by up to 90% compared with conventional diesel and can easily be used as a drop-in replacement fuel on all mobile Q-range models.

When needing a mobile crusher for their rental fleet, Rye were already familiar with Sandvik and contacted their local dealer, Retec Equipment. Requiring a machine that is compact and easy to transport, and yet capable of handling all types of demolition material, the QJ241 jaw crusher was the obvious choice for their operation.

Equipped with an emissions-compliant engine for reduced emissions, the QJ241 has a lower environmental impact than its predecessors and is able to operate with HVO as a replacement for diesel, which helped confirm Rye’s decision when selecting the best machine for the job.

Rye Demolition have transferred their entire fleet of plant and machinery to HVO, replacing diesel and thus eliminating in the region of 1,700 tonnes of CO2Ee. They have committed to purchasing 600,000 litres of HVO fuel over the next year, allowing them to transition not only their site plant and machinery away from diesel, but also their road vehicles.

Simon Barlow, managing director of Rye Group, said: ‘Through years of operation, we have refined our ways of working and are focused on continual improvement and making a positive impact on all our stakeholders.’

Share this page

Add new comment

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Tirzah